Xtrade And Gimmer Form Trading Partnership

CCN

Xtrade.io’s vision is to bring Wall Street Trading to the emerging Cryptocurrency markets. Before Christmas CCN interviewed Alexander Kravets on his new idea. An experienced trader with more than 20 years in the business, Kravets understood that for cryptotrading to be successful, it had to somehow mirror traditional trading.

Today Kravets announces a new partnerhship with Gimmer, an existing decentralised automated cryptocurrency trading platform. XTRADE.IO will be bringing their expertise to further develop Gimmer’s back end systems. This will include building a unified FIX API to allow Gimmer users to execute strategies across multiple exchanges automatically as well as aggregated liquidity.

Kravets says, ‘Gimmer is a pioneer in the retail algorithmic crypto market space and an ideal partner for leveraging XTRADE’s institutional grade infrastructure, single-portal API, and multi-market connectivity for market data and execution.

By partnering with XTRADE.IO, Gimmer and their clients can expect higher fill rates, deeper liquidity across exchanges, greater opportunities for arbitrage, longer uptimes, and reduced latencies for multi-asset crypto execution’,’ he says.

Using AI, Gimmer’s trading bots can execute deals quickly at the best possible price. Gimmer already has a working beta version and a crypto trading bot app that has been downloaded over 10,000 times.

The trading bots take the emotion out of investing and make cryptocurrency mainstream. In addition, Gimmer can recommend, based on the user’s risk profile, the best and most profitable trading bot strategy. In addition, successful traders can make additional revenue by renting their strategies to other customers through the Gimmer bot store.

The Gimmer platform works by securely connecting to a customer’s cryptocurrency exchange account and then uses advanced algorithmic trading bots to make the trades on behalf of the customer at parameters that the customer has preset. This makes Gimmer suitable for anyone who wants to trade and invest in the cryptocurrency market but does not have the relevant trading skills or the time to watch the markets all day long. It means that Gimmer users can buy and sell and earn profits while they sleep.

Gimmer allows its users to configure a trading bot to include any number of indicators, safeties and currencies, then back test it to see how the strategy would have performed over previous trading periods, which is worked out using historical data. When ready, users charge their bot with Gimmer tokens and it then connect directly and securely with the preferred exchange, sending the buy and sell commands automatically. By using AI and pre-planned strategies, the trader can take the emotion out of their investment decisions, meaning Gimmer is going to be a gateway into the crypto market for a whole new sector of investors.

The addition of the XTRADE.IO technology will enhance Gimmer’s offering, which gives novice and experienced traders the best and most intuitive decentralised trading platform in the crypto sector.

Gimmer yesterday launched its token presale and a public token sale will be held next month from February 1 until February 28, 2018. There is a soft cap of 4800 ETH and hard cap of 35000 ETH.

Philipe Comini, Co-founder and CEO of Gimmer says, ‘We have an excellent core team and array of advisers and partners that will enable us to hit all our roadmap targets and deliver the very best product. Currently, only a few platforms offer automated trading, but they also require expert programming skills and knowledge of the cryptocurrency market. Gimmer’s decentralised platform will make it easy for the mass market to become involved in automated crypto trading for the first time.’

 

CharityStars, Aiming For The Stars

CCN

‘We are all in the gutter but some of us are looking at the stars.’ Oscar Wilde

Four years ago Francesco Nazari Fusetti set up CharityStars, a fund raising platform for charities. It linked celebrities with charitable causes, delivering funds to charities in a transparent, online manner.

Initially Fusetti approached celebrities, looking to get them to donate their time, possessions or support for charity. Over time, this has changed and charities began instead to approach the CharityStars platform to post their projects with their own celebrity ambassadors; CharityStars having proven an ability to deliver – matching causes, celebrities and donors – the latter now numbering 40,000 active people.

Fusetti is very proud of his organisation pointing to the $10 million raised since the formation of the company with mainstream charities benefitting such as WWF, UNICEF and Save the Children.

With the original office located in his native Italy and still accounting for more than 30% of all income generated, new offices have been opened in the UK and US. This is important as while the donors and bidders are worldwide, many of the celebrity experiences on offer are geographically based – such as lunch with a star or a poker game with an entrepreneur.

Monies are raised in three ways; the main income is by auctioning off a celebrity experience or luxury product, secondly income is derived from direct bids on products and finally people can enter a sweepstake for $5 which enters them for a random draw for a special prize.

CharityStars takes 15% commission on the net monies raised; sometimes there are third party costs but these fees are capped so that the minimum sum delivered to the charity is 72% of the total.

‘Porting our platform onto the blockchain was a natural move for us,’ explains Fusetti. ‘Our core business has been about transparency in the charity sector.  There is an inherent distrust on how charities are managed – in direct opposition to people’s inherent desire to support their cause. We were able to bridge that gap initially through a transparent online platform – moving onto the blockchain when it became available was the obvious next step.’

This year, CharityStars created and backed AidCoin, an ERC20 utility token that allows people to donate to charities while easily tracking their donations on a public ledger.

By using blockchain technology to track transactions, cryptocurrencies to transfer funds and smart contracts to ensure donations are spent correctly, CharityStars aims to introduce a new layer of transparency, traceability, enabling a better connection and increased trust between donor and recipient, and in turn helping charities to raise more money.

‘The beauty of the blockchain is that we can show total transparently how money is donated and spent. There are no hidden fees,’ says Fusetti. ‘Every donor can see their donation.’

CharityStars recently ran a number auctions to have lunch and even play poker with some of the industry’s most prominent leaders, such as Ryan Taylor, CEO of Dash, Brock Pierce, Chairman of the Bitcoin Foundation, serial entrepreneur Jeremy Gardner, Erik Voorhees, CEO of ShapeShift and Galia Benartzi, Co-founder of Bancor.

‘This raised $60,000 for the associated charities,’ says Fusetti.

Asked about his wish list celebrity experience Fusetti was firm in his answer: ‘I would love to meet Vitalik Buterin – he has changed the world, although I am not sure if I could bid enough to win that experience,’ he says. ‘But I would also have enjoyed meeting our top tier blockchain industry leaders. I am very engaged by this space.’

AidCoin also allows charities to integrate a donation button, called AIDPay, on their website that enables the acceptance of cryptocurrencies for their fundraising campaigns. Donors can donate in any cryptocurrency or altcoin that will then be converted into AidCoin at the current exchange rate. CharityStars will be the first platform to utilize the token internally among its community of 40,000 bidders.

“With the rapid adoption of cryptocurrencies holding the potential to impact the way in which we donate, I am certain that AidCoin is set to play a leading role in this new era of fundraising,” concluded Fusetti.

In its November pre-Sale, more than $4million was raised and now the company is looking at its full ICO in January 16, looking to raise 30,000 Ether or whatever that will equate to in dollars.

The Crypto Valley Of Zug, Why Switzerland Is The Place To Be For Bitcoin, Ethereum And Blockchain Initiatives

CCN

Coming to a city near you…

At first glance it might seem an unusual choice for the hottest tech location in Europe, if not EMEA, but Zug, named for its fishing rights is both a town and canton in Switzerland and home to a little under 30,000 residents. It is an affluent area, a low tax region and a base for several multinational companies. In 2001, it first sparked to international recognition when a disgruntled gunman shot 15 people, including himself, in the Zug Cantonal Parliament in what became known as the Zug Massacre.

This year, Zug was very much back in the news for quite different reasons. In January 2017 a not for profit organisation was formed: the Crypto Valley Association (CVA) headquartered in Zug and formed for the express purpose of attracting and supporting blockchain companies and organisations to Switzerland. Prior to the formal establishment of CVA, the Crypto Valley in Zug had been the brain child of Johann Grevers who based his cryptofinance startup Monetas in Zug in 2013. He outlined all sorts of positive reasons why Switzerland was attractive for blockchain companies and soon attracted broad support from numerous individuals, startups, corporates, service providers, industry associations, educational institutions, governments and regulators.

Grever’s own particular career has been recently mired by his own success. Tezos, which aimed to build a new digital commonwealth, used Grever’s ICO foundation company through which to raise money. They were successful, very successful with $232 million raised (and now worth twice that with inflation), but Grevers and the founders of Tezos are locked in a bitter infight. Sometimes the price of success is too high.

Zug itself carried on as a leading light for crypto companies. Ethereum incorporated in Zug in 2014 and the first bitcoin ATMs were installed. In 2015, Shapeshift located in Zug and in the same year the Swiss Federal council issued a report that bitcoins were regarded as a virtual currency and no further regulations were required.

The following year the Zug tax authority issued guidelines for the accounting and tax treatment of bitcoin and the city of Zug became the first government in the world to officially accept bitcoin payments.

Oliver Bussman, as President of the CVA, is overseeing a membership which is growing at an exponential rate. Since its foundation in January membership has grown to in excess of 500 members and that figure is growing at 30 new members per month. Membership fees are denominated in Swiss Francs (CHF) costing 100 CHF for an individual member and CHF 300 for a corporate.

In an interview with Bitcoin Magazine, Bussmann explained that unlike other ecosystems, such as Silicon Valley, entrepreneurs can expect to find every possible resource necessary for a successful token launch within a 30-mile radius of Crypto Valley.

“We have advisors helping with value proposition and token economy, seasoned legal experts, tax experts, accounting experts, people specialized in global marketing and global communications PR, secure ICO launch platforms, independent audit firms, smart contract audits, KYC, AML utilities and a community of investors looking to support the product.”

Switzerland has a lot of historic features which lends itself to the decentralised view of the world. Its own political system is based on a citizen-controlled ethos and boasts century’s old culture of individual rights. Coupled with Swiss neutrality, business-friendly environment and privacy-friendly financial and legal infrastructures, it is very successfully marketing itself as a hub for crypto friendly companies.

Last month, the CVA announced its first strategic partner in KPMG Switzerland. KPMG will be an active member and chair two working groups; one on Tax, Accounting and Structuring and the other on Cyber Security. But it is not just corporations that want in; a local hotel and restaurant, the Swiss Chalet Merlischachen, is now accepting bitcoin and ethereum as payment for its food and hospitality. It claims to be the first hospitality company in Zug to accept alt currency.

Zug and the Crypto Valley would seem a powerful advocate for all things blockchain. Their example is catching. Just a week ago, Ireland stepped up to the plate and announced its own crypto centre. Called Crypto Coast and headed up by blockchain veteran Reuben Godfrey, the Irish hub is seeking to do the same as Crypto Valley. However, where Switzerland and Zug may offer traditional financial expertise, Ireland’s Crypto Coast has based its foundation on a wealth of blockchain professionals and positive government support.

In conclusion, it’s not really a question of the Crypto Valley being in competition with the Crypto Coast and more a question of how soon the rest of the world will follow suit

Indorse – Spelling The End Of The Dishonest CV…

Just how do you know if what people claim in their CV is true? For a time, google seemed to deliver an endless source of data on other people. You could search for people online and see where they had worked. Then social media made it even easier to track people – or so it seemed.

In the last few years prospective employees have been warned that when they attend interviews, the company looking to hire will include a trawl of their social media to see if what they say is true or to ascertain the calibre of the person.

Of course there have already been cases where legal claims have been made against individuals abusing social media, but even harmless activities may be seen as detrimental to prospective employment. Applying to a company where the CEO is teetotal? Then perhaps don’t post those post party pictures on FB. Looking to work in a company that works in pet supplies? Perhaps posting pictures of you supporting the local hunt might not be so clever. The list is endless.

However, while verifying your character online is one thing, verifying your career details is another. Most CVs have referees which a thorough employer will use, but what if the person has set out to deliberately inflate their CV. Is it possible to check that online?

The majority of employers would head over to Linkedin – and indeed most management on ICOs link directly to their Linkedin page. Linkedin in an established platform but there is a flaw. Only the individual can insert their CV details. No one else can comment on them. The nearest there exists for validation of the CV details is in the recommendation section – but these could be from friends or even fake accounts should a person wish to deceive.

So how can an employer quickly check out the veracity of a CV, or indeed how can a candidate stand out with their skill sets?

Indorse, a decentralised professional social media network, think they have the answer. And so do 1800 token account holders that helped raise $9 million over their ICO in September. This sum will keep them going for the next two years says co-founder David Moskowitz. ‘We learnt a lot from our ICO – basically to keep any future ones shorter and have more focus on the secondary market.’

His co-founder and CTO, Guarang Torvekar adds that they would have liked to have more celebrity endorsement. Ánd better known advisers.’

Which brings us to one of the principles of Indorse – peer to peer validation. Peer to peer validation on Indorse is random and anonymous.

‘There have been a few ICO scandals recently over CVs from the fraudulent state where advisers were not part of the team to the lesser crime of inflating their CVs quite dramatically. Even today what we read on Linkedin we tend to believe – despite the fact that it is published by the individual,’ says Mosowitz.

‘You cannot game the system on Indorse,’ adds Torvekar. ‘You can’t ask your spouse or colleague to endorse you. All the validation is random and is only allocated once a consensus is reached to the order of 70%.’

The individual adds their skill sets with attached proof. So, if someone claimed to have Java programing skills, they could attach their certification. Then anonymous, random peers can validate – or not – that section.

Timelines are important too according to Torvekar. ‘Someone working for 20 years should have a much greater wealth of experience than someone working for less than 5 years, and that is reflected too in how the Indorse CV is created.’

People deemed to have authentic and experienced CV will receive an Indorse Score. This is delivered in the form of a non-transferable, non-tradable token. This is to reflect their reputation. Other members of the Indorse community can earn tokens as rewards for participating on the site. These are tradable and transferable and mimic the popular Steemit model.  In time the co-founders hope the IND tokens will be used to purchase or sell additional services on the site.

The use of blockchain is core to the project according to Torvekar. He was instrumental in setting up the Singapore Ethereum meetup two years ago (where he met Moskowitz) which now regularly attracts a couple of hundred to each gathering. They launched Indorse at one such meetup.

‘Blockchain underpins our decentralised model in four ways,’ explains Torvekar. ‘’The first is the management of the data – there is no single point that is vulnerable. Secondly, Indorse is completely autonomous – no one is in control.

‘We use Byzantine Fault Tolerance to produce consensus and finally it is transparent – no more inflated at best or totally dishonest CVs on our platform.’

Already 1800 people have signed up for the beta MVP version and both co-founders hope to hit 3000 before the end of the year.

With two years’ worth of salaries in their pocket what next for the founders? ‘Company pages.’ says Moskowitz. ‘We want to extend the same transparency to corporates.’ Now, that will be interesting.

CNN

Dashing Over Bitcoin, Why Dash Gained 40% In Value, Fernando Gutierrez Explains

Original post on CryptoCoin.News

Last week the cancellation of the Hard Fork in Bitcoin had the markets jumping and in particular the altcoins gained a lot of ground (60% in some cases) before things levelled off. Dash was one of the alt coins to be so positively affected and while it jumped all over the place it settled back to a comfortable gain of a net 40% to lie at the $430 mark. Given its gain in value since the start of the month this might be argued to be a function of more than just the cancellation of the SegWit2x or at least the head of legal at Dash, Fernando Gutierrez would argue as such.

Based in Spain, Gutierrez has been involved with Dash for three years. The first non-developer to be appointed to the board, Gutierrez is genuinely cryto-curious, a specialisation from general curiosity before.

‘My wife is relieved,’ laughs Gutierrez. ‘Previously my curiosity led me to online learning constantly. I was doing all-nighters taking online courses on everything from sociology to physics. Now I am just concentrating on cryptocurrency.’

Gutierrez is self-deprecating as he is also a fully-qualified lawyer, economist and owner of a number of successful business across gaming, video and health service – a true renaissance man.

Gutierrez argues that while the hard fork naturally impacting the markets, the surge in price for Dash was inexorable. ‘The same weekend we begun trading on Asian exchanges which pushed our price,’ he says on the phone from Spain. ‘And coupled with the release of new software, Version 12.2, we had a lot of good things to talk about, not least the fact that the very schism that divided Bitcoin was being addressed by our upgrades; notably the extension of the size of our Block to 2Mg. It was a natural flight to our coin.’

The argument of Dash being a safe haven must be tempered by its somewhat unruly past and in particular it’s first launch day where 2 million coins were mined creating a dubious instamine. The founder claims that the community did not wish to see a relaunch and mining has continued at a more sedate pace where on average 3k coins are mined daily. Despite this start, Dash has set up to tackle the payments industry and operates a number of separate technologies which separates and arguably improves on the core Bitcoin structure.

Most notable is the two tier structure. Miners mine new blocks and are paid a percentage (originally at 80% and now to 45%), while Masternodes are used for payments  – Private Send, InstantSend and governance of the eco system. To become a Masternode requires the holding of 1000 Dash coins, an expensive business at today’s prices, and anyone cashing in and going below that volume automatically loses their vote. Skin in the game is the rationale behind that. 10% of fees go back into Dash to pay for full time developers. This is key according to Gutierrez.

‘We can afford to pay developers and that is another reason to favour Dash over Bitcoin and other coins,’ he says.

Gutierrez feels that the cancellation of 2x signals strongly that Bitcoin is abandoning the payment model. ‘Slowed transactions and higher fees can only mean one thing – Bitcoin is going full-on for the storied value model,’ he argues. ‘They are not properly addressing the horrible user experience. The Lighting Network is being touted as a solution but that is not in place as yet.  In the short term, Bitcoin cannot compete in its current form as a payments carrier.’

The crisis of the size of the Bitcoin blockchain has ironically already been addressed by Dash – it has already increased its blocksize to that of 2Mgs and promised faster, cheaper transactions as a result.

Gutierrez is pretty confident about the future of Dash. V 12.2 has brought a lot of new features to the market – ‘We don’t do fake news,’ he says, ‘we only announce when we have features locked down,’ – and Evolution is planned for mid 2018.

‘We are very excited about Evolution,’ he says. ‘We have a number of key features that are going to make Dash very engaging – DAPI and DashDrive in particular. DAPI or Distributed APIs mean we can connect randomly to any cluster of servers. This will increase speed and security. While DashDrive means we can simplify the process of payments, work outside the blockchain and swap in usernames for long private keys. Having a username on the DashDrive means we can also offer password recovery.

‘And we are launching a HD Wallet on DashDrive making it easier again,’ says Gutierrez. ‘We know that the average Dash or alt coin holder is not a deep techie. They don’t want to be bothered by security and keys and keeping everything up to date. They want to use their digital wallet in much the same way as their physical one. We are building that on user experience to simplify, speed up and lower the costs of using Dash.’

All up Gutierrez’s argument that Dash’s appreciation of value is less to do with the cancellation of the hard fork and more to do with their concerted development seems to hold water. ‘We can’t ignore Bitcoin, when it rallies, alt coins surge in its slipstream,’ he says. ‘But we are doing things for ourselves. We are building value for ourselves as well and we’re not just piggy-backing on a trend.’

Hashgraph – can it give Blockchain a run for its money?

Ken Anderson, admin of the official Hashgraph Telegram Dev Group as well as CTO for Irish ICO Mingo, believes that Hashgraph has the potential to either eliminate or upgrade the many issues facing the Blockchain.

‘It makes sense that the next step is not another public Blockchain, but a new distributed ledger technology,’ he says. ‘Development is all about improving technology, not getting a piggy back just for the sake of it.’

Maybe it is his background as an ex-Military Intelligence Specialist in the US Army that makes Anderson somewhat fearless when it comes to evaluating new technology. ‘I’m committed to vetting Hashgraph,’ he says.

Anderson and his developers in Mingo have been given permission to go inside the technology but it will be several months before he will commit to his final verdict on the new distributed ledger.

So what is Hashgraph and why might it have the potential to overthrow Blockchain?  Firstly, it should be noted that the Hashgraph platform, which is a distributed ledger developed by Swirlds, is currently a private ledger, does not have an ICO planned nor does it have a cryptocurrency.

It does however, take some pretty big swipes at the problematic issues facing Blockchain.

‘If you asked me to say why Hashgraph is looking so good, I’d have to say it is because it addresses issues such as speed, size and fairness before we even look at the core elements of Hashgraph which is also provable, Byzantine, ACID compliant, efficient, inexpensive, timestamped, DoS resistant, and optionally non-permissioned,’ says Anderson.

Hashgraph claims it is much faster than Bitcoin. Bitcoin can only handle 7 transactions per second compared with Visa which can handle 100,000 transactions. Theoretically Hashgraph can handle 250,000 in the same time and maybe more if the bandwidth is sufficiently wide. Bandwidth is the defining factor unlike Blockchain which needs to increase its size to increase transactions which only adds complexity.

Then there is the issue of Proof of Work (POW) in Blockchain. Originally conceived as a consensual and fair way of allocating rewards to miners there are difficulties.  In Bitcoin, miners can control the order of transactions – often on arbitrary terms. Given that Bitcoin can never 100% guarantee confirm a transaction, despite the more blocks moving towards consensus, this creates an inherent, albeit random, bias in the system. It also one of the main reasons mining is so expensive.

Hashgraph on the other hand operates a consensus time stamp approach which means no miner can sideline another and all blocks are accepted in the chain, purely on a timed basis.

In Hashgraph once an event happens everyone on the network knows this. In addition, since there is full disclosure on the network then old blocks can be consigned to history and discarded if wanted. This shrinks the amount of storage from Bitcoin’s current 60GB to a fraction of a single gigabyte. That would even fit on a typical smartphone.

Much of the problems in Blockchain development and future direction also lies in the difficulty by which consensus is achieved – it is not a given but only a growing probability which can lend itself to hard forks and slow reactions to changes.

Hashgraph on the other hand uses the Byzantine fault tolerant protocol. This means no one individual can stop a decision, nor can a decision be reversed by an individual. To maintain this progress Hashgraph also uses Gossip about Gossip protocol. This protocol is well known in the programming community where nodes exchange information to every other node randomly, no one is left hanging and every bit of information – or gossip – is shared on the chain.  Therefore how each node will vote is known in the chain as well as what each node knows and when it got that information is time stamped. If there is an affair in the village then everyone knows about it. This is one village not to plan adultery if you want to stay married.

Currently Hashgraph is a private distributed ledger so it will take people like Anderson to evaluate its claims. If they are right – and it is faster, safer, fairer, cheaper and better as claimed – then it looks likely Hashgraph will give Blockchain a run for its money.